Patagonia's "Buy Less" Campaign May Lead to More Revenue - Eric Lowitt - Harvard Business Review

buy less, buy less, buy less.

share. trade.

recycle. upcycle. repurpose. repair. redesign.

feel the pangs of consciousness in your heart when you throw something away. it will be back, we live in a closed system. we did not evolve stuffing plastic items into plastic bags and pretending we weren’t. we are sick with waste and plastic. we are living together at the 11th hour of humanity.

Are you ready to accept the challenge and evolve? I am.

unconsumption:

We noted Patagonia’s Common Threads initiative, in partnership with eBay, last month: The idea involves making it easier for people to buy and sell used Patagonia products. This column in the Harvard Business Review assesses this idea as a business strategy. An excerpt:

Could a message of “buy less” actually lead to growth for the company? If so, could other companies follow a similarly counterintuitive approach to growth? The answers are “yes” and “maybe.”

To put its buy-less idea into action, Patagonia recently partnered with eBay to enable consumers to resell their used Patagonia apparel via the Common Threads Initiative within eBay. In addition, consumers will now be able to resell their used Patagonia apparel on a new Used Clothing & Gear section on Patagonia’s website. The company wants to influence consumer buying behavior as part of its corporate mission. Patagonia (and other sustainability pundits) views individuals’ consumption as a considerable drain on natural resources. And with the global population forecast to swell to over 9 billion by 2050, left unchecked, this drain will become significant.

Patagonia’s campaign appears both genuine and borderline heroic. But could this approach actually lead to increased sales? And if so, should your company pursue a similar strategy? Three tactics are available to companies that focus on high-quality goods. Companies that aren’t known for high quality will have a much more difficult time employing the first tactic in particular.

The rest is here.

DO YOU have what it takes to create a healthy and whole human being?
This is a big job. Do you have the skills, resources, time, energy, insight, patience, knowledge, support, initiative, intuition, creativity, passion, integrity, and drive to create a human, support them into adulthood, and can you leave them a thriving planet in which they can prosper?
7 billion is a lot. We are reaching a crisis point on planet Earth. If we do not immediately start making responsible, reproductive decisions, as a collective, symbiotic species, we are doomed, and there will be nothing for the children anywhere.
mothernaturenetwork:

Crowded Earth: How many is too many?As the planet’s population grows, only a revolution in the use of resources can avert an environmental crunch.

DO YOU have what it takes to create a healthy and whole human being?

This is a big job. Do you have the skills, resources, time, energy, insight, patience, knowledge, support, initiative, intuition, creativity, passion, integrity, and drive to create a human, support them into adulthood, and can you leave them a thriving planet in which they can prosper?

7 billion is a lot. We are reaching a crisis point on planet Earth. If we do not immediately start making responsible, reproductive decisions, as a collective, symbiotic species, we are doomed, and there will be nothing for the children anywhere.

mothernaturenetwork:

Crowded Earth: How many is too many?
As the planet’s population grows, only a revolution in the use of resources can avert an environmental crunch.

mothernaturenetwork:

Why we should think ahead … way aheadIn order to see a difference with climate change, we need to look ahead and make a commitment to a future we will never see.
There are cathedrals that took generations to build — can you imagine starting to build something in the sure knowledge that neither you, nor even your friends or immediate family, would ever see it finished? These people lived in times of uncertainty — plagues, wars, shifting alliances, religious reform — and their average life expectancy was half ours, but their vision was vast. Today, we live longer, but have lost our connection with the future.
Read more.

mothernaturenetwork:

Why we should think ahead … way ahead
In order to see a difference with climate change, we need to look ahead and make a commitment to a future we will never see.

There are cathedrals that took generations to build — can you imagine starting to build something in the sure knowledge that neither you, nor even your friends or immediate family, would ever see it finished? These people lived in times of uncertainty — plagues, wars, shifting alliances, religious reform — and their average life expectancy was half ours, but their vision was vast. Today, we live longer, but have lost our connection with the future.

Read more.

When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

thetripster:

—Cree Prophecy

P L A S T I C   I S   T R A S H Y

littledynamite:

BAG IT. 

Hey you… yea YOU! I know we probably don’t know each other but I need to ask you a favor. Will you please watch this documentary on plastic and what it is doing to our planet?! Maybe even pass it on? If nothing more, view the trailer and then try your best to avoid plastic?! It means the WORLD to me, literally. Thanks.

(Source: stormsequalrainbows)

In the end, our society will be defined not only by what we create, but by what we refuse to destroy.

—John C. Sawhill (via olivianora)

mothernaturenetwork:

Coral killed by human sewageHuman sewage is to blame for a disease that is killing elkhorn coral, listed as endangered several years ago because of a massive die-off.

mothernaturenetwork:

Coral killed by human sewage
Human sewage is to blame for a disease that is killing elkhorn coral, listed as endangered several years ago because of a massive die-off.

mohandasgandhi:

An Ocean Miracle in the Gulf of California

For generations we have been taking fish out of the ocean at a rate faster than they can reproduce. The problem is that there are fewer and fewer fish to meet an ever-increasing demand. The solution is simply to take less so that we can continue eating fish for a longer time.
Opponents of conservation, however, argue that regulating fishing will destroy jobs and hurt the economy–but they are wrong, and there are real-world examples that prove this. A scientific study published today by the Public Library of Science shows that protecting an area brings the fish back, and creates jobs and increases economic revenue for the local communities. I have seen it with my own eyes and, believe me, it is like a miracle, only that it is not–it’s just common business sense.
Cabo Pulmo National Park in Baja California, Mexico, was protected in 1995 to safeguard the largest coral community in the Gulf of California. When I dove there for the first time in 1999, I thought the corals were very nice, but there were not so many fishes, and I didn’t think the place was extraordinary. Together with Octavio Aburto and other Mexican colleagues we dove at many sites in the gulf, in a region spanning over 1,000 km. Cabo Pulmo was just like most other places I’d seen in the Gulf of California.
But the Cabo Pulmo villagers wanted more. They decided that the waters in front of their settlement were going to be a no-take marine reserve – fishing was banned with the hopes of bringing the fish back. They had a vision, and they succeeded in a way that exceeded all expectations, including mine.
In 2009 we went back to Cabo Pulmo to monitor the fish populations. We jumped in the water, expecting fishes to be more abundant after 10 years of protection. But we could not believe what we saw–thousands upon thousands of large fishes such as snappers, groupers, trevally, and manta rays. They were so abundant that we could not see each other if we were fifteen meters apart. We saw more sharks in one dive at Cabo Pulmo than in 10 years of diving throughout the Gulf of California!
Our research indicated that the fish biomass increased by 460% at Cabo Pulmo–to a level similar to remote pristine coral reefs that have never been fished. In contrast, all other sites in the Gulf of California that we revisited in 2009 were as degraded as ten years earlier. This shows that it is possible to bring back the former richness of the ocean that man has obliterated, but that without our dedication, the degradation will continue.
Most importantly for the people of Cabo Pulmo, since their reef is now the only healthy reef left in the Gulf of California, it has attracted divers, which bring economic revenue. And fishermen around the marine reserve are catching more fish than before thanks to the spillover of fish from the no-take marine reserve. It seems like a win-win to me!
The question is: how can we have more of these?

Environmental sustainability is possible.

mohandasgandhi:

An Ocean Miracle in the Gulf of California

For generations we have been taking fish out of the ocean at a rate faster than they can reproduce. The problem is that there are fewer and fewer fish to meet an ever-increasing demand. The solution is simply to take less so that we can continue eating fish for a longer time.

Opponents of conservation, however, argue that regulating fishing will destroy jobs and hurt the economy–but they are wrong, and there are real-world examples that prove this. A scientific study published today by the Public Library of Science shows that protecting an area brings the fish back, and creates jobs and increases economic revenue for the local communities. I have seen it with my own eyes and, believe me, it is like a miracle, only that it is not–it’s just common business sense.

Cabo Pulmo National Park in Baja California, Mexico, was protected in 1995 to safeguard the largest coral community in the Gulf of California. When I dove there for the first time in 1999, I thought the corals were very nice, but there were not so many fishes, and I didn’t think the place was extraordinary. Together with Octavio Aburto and other Mexican colleagues we dove at many sites in the gulf, in a region spanning over 1,000 km. Cabo Pulmo was just like most other places I’d seen in the Gulf of California.

But the Cabo Pulmo villagers wanted more. They decided that the waters in front of their settlement were going to be a no-take marine reserve – fishing was banned with the hopes of bringing the fish back. They had a vision, and they succeeded in a way that exceeded all expectations, including mine.

In 2009 we went back to Cabo Pulmo to monitor the fish populations. We jumped in the water, expecting fishes to be more abundant after 10 years of protection. But we could not believe what we saw–thousands upon thousands of large fishes such as snappers, groupers, trevally, and manta rays. They were so abundant that we could not see each other if we were fifteen meters apart. We saw more sharks in one dive at Cabo Pulmo than in 10 years of diving throughout the Gulf of California!

Our research indicated that the fish biomass increased by 460% at Cabo Pulmo–to a level similar to remote pristine coral reefs that have never been fished. In contrast, all other sites in the Gulf of California that we revisited in 2009 were as degraded as ten years earlier. This shows that it is possible to bring back the former richness of the ocean that man has obliterated, but that without our dedication, the degradation will continue.

Most importantly for the people of Cabo Pulmo, since their reef is now the only healthy reef left in the Gulf of California, it has attracted divers, which bring economic revenue. And fishermen around the marine reserve are catching more fish than before thanks to the spillover of fish from the no-take marine reserve. It seems like a win-win to me!

The question is: how can we have more of these?

Environmental sustainability is possible.

(via mothernaturenetwork)

mothernaturenetwork:

Here are seven lessons we can borrow from our elders that are easy on the wallet, and have significant environmental impact. Perhaps more importantly, they are easy to implement and relevant to our modern lifestyles — no extolling the virtues of riding a horse to work!7 green things our grandparents did

mothernaturenetwork:

Here are seven lessons we can borrow from our elders that are easy on the wallet, and have significant environmental impact. Perhaps more importantly, they are easy to implement and relevant to our modern lifestyles — no extolling the virtues of riding a horse to work!
7 green things our grandparents did

mothernaturenetwork:

Raising awareness of plastic wasteCampaigners and scientists are increasingly sounding the alarm over the amount of plastic that is used wastefully, or that ends up as trash in rivers and oceans. Many say that plastic pollution has swelled into a major threat.

mothernaturenetwork:

Raising awareness of plastic waste
Campaigners and scientists are increasingly sounding the alarm over the amount of plastic that is used wastefully, or that ends up as trash in rivers and oceans. Many say that plastic pollution has swelled into a major threat.

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY